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We are dedicated to making healthcare research both relevant and accessible to patients and the public. We are able to offer the opportunity to be involved in research in a variety of ways.

If you want to know more about research and there are several useful websites for you to visit:

  • NHS Choices gives general information about research in the NHS.

  • INVOLVE is a national advisory group that supports greater public involvement in NHS, public health and social care research.

  • James Lind Alliance is a non-profit making initiative which was established in 2004. It brings patients, carers and clinicians together to identify and prioritise the top 10 uncertainties, or 'unanswered questions', about the effects of treatments that they agree are most important.

  •  The NIHR Be part of Research campaign encourages patients, carers and the public to get involved in research.

Research participation

Many Trust staff are currently working to support research that could benefit patients, but without our patients volunteering to take part, it would be impossible for this research to take place. Research studies often need many participants to find out which treatments are likely to be the most effective for the majority of the population.

The first objective of any research study conducted in the NHS is to safeguard the participant.

The other objectives of research are to:

  • Reduce treatment risks

  • Collect quality data to assess patient outcomes

  • Conduct research informed by excellent science

It is important to recognise that clinical research does not always directly benefit the person participating but knowledge of different conditions can be gained that will help inform how to best treat patients in the future.

The best way to find out what research studies are open in our rust is to ask your doctor or clinical team. You can also see what studies are currently open further down this page, or contact us for more information.

Even if there are ongoing studies relating to your condition, there are strict inclusion and exclusion criteria and you may not be eligible. Please speak with your doctor or clinical team about it first, they will be able to advise you.

Before you agree to participate in any research, the research will be explained fully to you. You are encouraged to take information about the research away with you to read and discuss with your family, friends and/or GP before making any decisions. Participation is voluntary and you can withdraw from the research study at any time you wish– no questions asked. Your current and future treatments will not be influenced by your decision – you will always receive the care your doctor or clinical team feels is in your best interest.

Depending on the research study, and each one is different, you are likely to receive more investigations and monitoring of your symptoms, progress, and any associated problems. This could mean attending the hospital for a couple of extra appointments. You may also have a named research nurse or clinical trials practitioner who you may contact at any time.

You will not get paid to take part in the research but you may have any out-of-pocket expenses, such as parking, reimbursed.

Research design

We are always looking into ways of improving research. One of the best ways of doing this is to ask people for their feedback.

You can help in many different ways and dedicate as much time as you wish, when it is convenient for you. You don’t need any particular knowledge or skills, just a willingness to give your opinion and the desire to get involved.

Involving patients and the public in the development of research studies ensures that the research is kept relevant and meaningful to patients; how a medical professional sees a disease may be very different to the experience of someone living with it. Not only is the quality of the research improved, but also the likelihood of the study succeeding in terms of recruiting patient participants into the study.

If you decide that you would like to get involved in research these are some of the things that you might be asked to do:

  • help researchers design their projects ensuring they ask the right questions and in a way that the public understand

  • help develop understandable information sheets for people taking part in research so that people being researched are approached in the right way

  • join a research management or advisory group thereby improving the quality of the research by adding another point of view

  • help interpret the results of the research

  • help make sure the research is reported in understandable ways

  • help make sure good research is heard about

We are dedicated to making healthcare research both relevant and accessible to patients and the public. We are able to offer the opportunity to be involved in research in a variety of ways.

If you want to know more about research and there are several useful websites for you to visit:

  • NHS Choices gives general information about research in the NHS.

  • INVOLVE is a national advisory group that supports greater public involvement in NHS, public health and social care research.

  • James Lind Alliance is a non-profit making initiative which was established in 2004. It brings patients, carers and clinicians together to identify and prioritise the top 10 uncertainties, or 'unanswered questions', about the effects of treatments that they agree are most important.

  •  The NIHR Be part of Research campaign encourages patients, carers and the public to get involved in research.

Research participation

Many Trust staff are currently working to support research that could benefit patients, but without our patients volunteering to take part, it would be impossible for this research to take place. Research studies often need many participants to find out which treatments are likely to be the most effective for the majority of the population.

The first objective of any research study conducted in the NHS is to safeguard the participant.

The other objectives of research are to:

  • Reduce treatment risks

  • Collect quality data to assess patient outcomes

  • Conduct research informed by excellent science

It is important to recognise that clinical research does not always directly benefit the person participating but knowledge of different conditions can be gained that will help inform how to best treat patients in the future.

The best way to find out what research studies are open in our rust is to ask your doctor or clinical team. You can also see what studies are currently open further down this page, or contact us for more information.

Even if there are ongoing studies relating to your condition, there are strict inclusion and exclusion criteria and you may not be eligible. Please speak with your doctor or clinical team about it first, they will be able to advise you.

Before you agree to participate in any research, the research will be explained fully to you. You are encouraged to take information about the research away with you to read and discuss with your family, friends and/or GP before making any decisions. Participation is voluntary and you can withdraw from the research study at any time you wish– no questions asked. Your current and future treatments will not be influenced by your decision – you will always receive the care your doctor or clinical team feels is in your best interest.

Depending on the research study, and each one is different, you are likely to receive more investigations and monitoring of your symptoms, progress, and any associated problems. This could mean attending the hospital for a couple of extra appointments. You may also have a named research nurse or clinical trials practitioner who you may contact at any time.

You will not get paid to take part in the research but you may have any out-of-pocket expenses, such as parking, reimbursed.

Research design

We are always looking into ways of improving research. One of the best ways of doing this is to ask people for their feedback.

You can help in many different ways and dedicate as much time as you wish, when it is convenient for you. You don’t need any particular knowledge or skills, just a willingness to give your opinion and the desire to get involved.

Involving patients and the public in the development of research studies ensures that the research is kept relevant and meaningful to patients; how a medical professional sees a disease may be very different to the experience of someone living with it. Not only is the quality of the research improved, but also the likelihood of the study succeeding in terms of recruiting patient participants into the study.

If you decide that you would like to get involved in research these are some of the things that you might be asked to do:

  • help researchers design their projects ensuring they ask the right questions and in a way that the public understand

  • help develop understandable information sheets for people taking part in research so that people being researched are approached in the right way

  • join a research management or advisory group thereby improving the quality of the research by adding another point of view

  • help interpret the results of the research

  • help make sure the research is reported in understandable ways

  • help make sure good research is heard about

Current open studies

If you wish to join a research study currently open at Basildon University Hospital you must first be under the care of this hospital. You should discuss your wishes to be involved in research with your doctor or clinical team as there are strict criteria for each research study and some studies may be more appropriate for you than others.

The decision to participate in a research study remains yours, but you may wish to discuss your participation with your family, friends and/or GP.

Our current open studies:

 

Useful links

safeguardingVisit our safeguarding page

healthwatchClick here for Your one-stop-shop for information about health and care services in your area.

Contact us

  • Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
    Nethermayne, Basildon
    Essex  SS16 5NL
    Switchboard: 01268 524900

  • The Essex Cardiothoracic Centre
    Nethermayne, Basildon
    Essex SS16 5NL
    Switchboard: 01268 524900

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